Remembering Cameron Rupp

In a move clearly intended to dominate headlines, the Phillies moved right-handed pitcher Drew Hutchison to their 40-man roster, likely guaranteeing him a spot in the Opening Day bullpen. To make room, catcher Cameron Rupp was designated for assignment, ending his tenure as a member of the Philadelphia Phillies.
Rupp, in a way, never stood a chance. That sentiment holds true no matter what context you look at it in, be it filling Chooch’s shoes in the eyes of the fanbase, trying to hold off two far-sexier prospects in Jorge Alfaro & Andrew Knapp, or trying to hit a pitcher who throws a decent fastball.
Originally drafted by the Phillies in the 3rd round out of the University of Texas, Rupp was never considered much of a prospect. Touted as a defense-first catcher who could hit enough to hold a backup job, Rupp failed to crack most top-prospect lists, constantly being overshadowed by the likes of Sebastian Valle, Gabriel Lino, and Deivi Grullon. By the time catchers like Knapp and Alfaro were added to the system, he could kiss his childhood dream of being in the Philadelphia Phillies top-30 prospect list goodbye. Continue reading…

2017 Phillies Report Card: Cameron Rupp

I don’t know whether it feels like Cameron Rupp has been around forever or just a little bit of time. the 2017 season marked, Rupp’s 5th in the majors, but he only played a combined 22 games in his first two seasons. What it does mean is that the 29 year old will enter the offseason arbitration eligible for the first time in his career. Rupp has been somewhere between the Phillies starting catcher and leader of a tandem for the past 3 seasons. Over that time he has hit .236/.301/.417 in just over 1000 plate appearances. He has shown good power, and this year nearly doubled his 2016 walk rate. Yet, we enter the offseason with Rupp on the outside look in at two younger catchers taking his job. Why?

We can start with the offense. In 2015 and 2016, Cameron Rupp was a 3 true outcomes catcher with large platoon splits. Things went even more extreme during the 2017 season. Rupp’s walk rate did nearly double from 5.7% to 10.3%, but his strikeout rate also skyrocketed. Among hitters with at least 300 plate appearances, his strikeout rate of 34.4% was 8th highest in the majors. Against right handed pitchers, he struck out at a staggering 36.9% of the time. As for his platoon split, after years of wrecking LHPs (.915 OPS and .993 OPS), he was merely ok against them this season with a .839 OPS. Rupp has never hit righties well, and in addition to the walk strikeout rate, he only hit .195 off of them this season. Put it all together and Rupp’s 88 OPS+ was a big step back from his 2016 season. Continue reading…