Aaron Altherr: The Best Extra-Base Hitter In MLB History, Sort Of

So here’s the thing about Aaron Altherr: he is the best* extra base hitter in major league history. (*Okay, sure, we’re going to need a few qualifiers here.)

During his major league career, Altherr has stepped to the plate 199 times and recorded 40 hits. If you think that sounds like it should result in a low batting average, you are correct. He’s batting just .237, but sports a significantly more impressive .338 on-base percentage thanks in large part to a 10.6 BB%. Now let’s take a look at a breakdown of those 40 hits:

Aaron Altherr’s 40 hits
Type #
Single 17
Double 12
Triple 4
Home Run 7

Add that all up and you’ll find 23 of Altherr’s 40 hits (or 57.5%!) have been of the extra-base variety. This got me wondering who holds the record for highest extra-base hit percentage (XBH% = XBH/H) and so I went to the best place to answer a question like that, the Baseball-Reference Play Index. I set the plate appearance minimum of 170 so that it was low enough to include Altherr and generated the following All-Time XBH% Leaderboard:
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Jake Thompson To Debut Saturday

It started last year with Alec Asher and Jerad Eickhoff. But Saturday, the first of the three marquee names in the 2015 Cole Hamels’ trade makes his big league debut with the Phillies. Jake Thompson came to the club last July with other top-flight prospects Nick Williams and Jorge Alfaro, injured MLB starter Matt Harrison, and Asher and Eickhoff, in exchange for Hamels and lefty reliever Jake Diekman. This weekend he becomes a big leaguer, and the 2000th player ever to wear the uniform of the franchise, (as has been tracked by The Good Phight’s @tgpschmenk, among others).

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Crash Landing: Watching Howard One Last Time

As I’m writing about baseball more and more, I have fewer and fewer opportunities to sit down and watch a game as a fan. I don’t mean that to sound like a complaint — writing about baseball is a joy and I’m incredibly blessed to have the gigs I have — but it is a statement of fact and it’s a big part of why I write this column each week. This column is part of my attempt to stay grounded in the emotional impact of the sport and it forces me to think about not just what I’m seeing in baseball but how I feel about it. Last night, baseball made me feel things.

I was at Citizens Bank Park sitting in the upper deck to watch the Phillies play the Giants. The crowd was sparse in comparison to the days of guaranteed sell-outs, but still sizable enough that the section I was in was packed. There were countless wonderful moments that I may or may not remember months or years from now — Odubel Herrera’s shoestring catch, the bullpen’s outstanding performance, Maikel Franco’s walk-off and Altherr’s Boner, Cameron Rupp’s mammoth home run to dead center — but there was one thing I know I’ll remember.

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Baseball Is Bad, Again

Welp.

Aaron Nola has been struggling on and off (mostly on) for two months now in ways that indicated something bigger was at play. The hope was that it was mechanical or mental, but the reality we’re now being presented with is that it’s injury related. This news is accompanied by a somewhat worrisome velocity decline in his most recent starts:

Nola velo

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The Barber Shop Reopens: Bailey DFA’d and Garcia Recalled

It would’ve made for a great story, but Andrew Bailey‘s comeback attempt with the Phillies has come to a sadly predictable conclusion.

Bailey began the season with Triple-A Lehigh Valley and found immediate success — 5 IP, 4 H, 1 R, 2 BB, 10 K — before being called up to the Phillies at the end of April. His time with the Phillies can be split into remarkably divergent halves — through June 3rd and since June 3rd.

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A Quiet Deadline In Philadelphia

A few weeks ago, I set up a “Who will the Phillies trade before the deadline?” poll on the sidebar. If you were one of the 6% who said “no one”, congratulations. The deadline has come and gone and the Phillies roster remains as is. Jeremy Hellickson will (presumably) make his next start in red pinstripes. Jeanmar Gomez is (presumsably) still the Phillies closer. The surprisingly effect Carlos Ruiz / Cameron Rupp catching tandem remains intact. The 2016 Phillies are today what they were yesterday.

It’s hard to be upset about the lack of trade activity. The most talked about trade chip, Jeremy Hellickson, is a league average pitcher who will be a free agent at the end of the season, but he’s also coming off three consecutive seasons in which he was well below league average for the Rays and the Diamondbacks. His 3.70 ERA is middling as is and his track record is not one that instills confidence he’ll be able to sustain even that moderate success going forward.

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Crash Landing: Trade Deadline Rumors Are The Worst

Things have been relatively quiet on the trade front over the past few days across baseball in general, but as it regards the Phillies, in particular. Jeremy Hellickson is still the only player generating much buzz and there haven’t been any particular salient rumors in the past few days. In fact, the only recent rumor to get picked up at all was generated as a result of this tweet from ESPN’s Jayson Stark:

This, in combination with a similar report about the Rays’ asking price for the various and sundry starting pitchers they may or may not trade, led to a MLB Trade Rumors headline: “Rays, Phillies Placing High Asking Prices On Starters“. Maybe it’s just me, but reading that headline instantly brought me back to the seemingly never-ending debates and controversies over the asking price for Cole Hamels spanning the offseason prior to the 2015 season all the way through his eventual trade to Texas.

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Altherr Activated; Bourjos to the DL

In a bit of expected news, the Phillies officially announced this transaction:

Peter Bourjos was injured when he Rowanded himself against the outfield wall during Tuesday night’s game in Miami.

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A Belated Look At The 2016 Draft, ft. Eric Longenhagen

A couple weeks back I asked Eric Longenhagen for his opinion of the Phils 2016 Draft. Since so much has been said already in regards to first overall pick, California prep center fielder Mickey Moniak, and since Eric wrote about him in his post-draft analysis at ESPN, I’ll just link you to that here.

Beyond that, we got into questions about the top six picks, best tools, drafting mentors/coaching candidates and more. Hope you enjoy this belated look at the Phils 2016 draft. (This is the part where I decided not to blame our nine-month old baby for my procrastination. Though really, it’s pretty much ALL HER FAULT. Please don’t tell her I said that).

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Brad: Is Moniak/Kevin Gowdy (rd 2) about as well as you think the Phils could have done with their top two picks and no supplemental round selections?

Eric: I think there were a few other players they would have preferred at 42 (like Rutherford and Wentz) but that Gowdy was the best they could do given their circumstances. They were really boxed in by where the Braves, Reds and Padres picked. I think they did as well as they could have.

B: Were you in charge, would you have been pushing hard to get a comp pick in trade? If I’m running the draft from 1.1 with less money than the guy picking behind me, I can’t imagine not walking into the executive washroom and setting my self on fire for another pick. Maybe not my whole self. At least the hair. (It’s taking its leave soon enough, in any case).

E: If all it would have taken was something like what ATL did with the Matusz deal, then yes I would have been all over that. As long as ownership was cool with it. That’s the kind of thing that GMs normally need permission to do.

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The Phillies’ Bad Offense Is Back With A Vengeance

Before the All-Star Break, the Phillies went on a wholly unexpected offensive tear. The offensive heroes were guys like Peter Bourjos, Cody Asche, Cameron Rupp, and Cesar Hernandez, so it’s hard to muster any surprise that the Phillies offense has crashed back to earth. The team entered play on Wednesday afternoon with a .208/.270/.317 team slashline through the first 12 games of the second half. It won’t surprise you to learn that their team 56 wRC+ is the worst of any major league team since the All-Star Break. Just how bad is a team 56 wRC+? Ryan Howard has a 52 wRC+ this season. Yes, since the All-Star Break, the Phillies as a team have been roughly as productive at the plate as Ryan Howard has all season.

In order to get a sense of how dramatic the change in offensive performance has been, I charted the team’s OPS the season in rolling ten game chunks beginning with games #1-#10 (April 4th to April 14th) and going all the way through games #93-102 (July 17th to July 26th). The results are a graphical illustration of what you likely already know to be true:

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