Crash Bag #4: Desi Relaford is Salty

In case you hadn’t heard, Desi Relaford thinks Phillies fans are trash. Here’s a counterpoint: Desi Relaford is trash. In parts of five seasons with the Phillies, Relaford came to the plate 1189 times and produced a 66 OPS+. In every single season Relaford was with the Phillies, he was below replacement level.

Here are his WAR totals with the Phillies: -2.0 fWAR and -1.8 bWAR. I have produced exactly 0.0 fWAR and 0.0 bWAR for the Phillies. Therefore, it’s logical to conclude that I’m a better  baseball player than Desi Relaford.

In short, Desi Relaford is a bum and deserves to be booed. Continue reading…

Phillies Positional Preview – Corner Infielders (Carlos Santana Edition)

Gabe Kapler, looking for a little show of leadership in the Phils clubhouse, asked newcomer Carlos Santana to talk with the squad about the potential he sees at the corner infield spots for the year. The following is a transcript of his remarks.

I want to thank Gabe for asking me to do this today. I’ve played with some fine infielders in my day, and on paper, I see that level of ability here. We all just need to Make It Real. Continue reading…

Crash Bag Volume #3: A Spring Training Lightning Round

None of the questions this week had deep answers needed, so I just answered them all. A big thank you to everyone who applied to write here. I will get back to you this weekend, and for the rest of you I am excited about some of the new voices we may add to the site.

@derrick_gentner: What’s your opening day lineup?

2B Cesar Hernandez
1B Carlos Santana
LF Rhys Hoskins
RF Nick Williams (assuming RH starter for Braves)
CF Odubel Herrera
3B Maikel Franco
SS J.P. Crawford
C Jorge Alfaro
SP Aaron Nola

I could see Herrera #2 and moving everyone down, but I like the OBP of the 1-2-3. Continue reading…

Quick Thoughts on Outfield Shifts

Today for the second time this Spring Training, the Phillies had their left and right fielders swap. As Matt Gelb wrote last week, the Phillies are looking to be more aggressive with their outfield shifts. Positioning players to be deeper or shallow based on game situation (outs, batter, pitcher, count, and potentially a lot of other variables) seems actually fairly normal given what we have seen on the infield. Shift don’t always work, and when they don’t, it can look pretty bad, but playing the percentages makes some sense.

Then there is your left and right fielders running past your center fielder before a batter steps to the plate. Having players change positions mid inning is something that we are seeing on infield shifts more. Last year it led to Anthony Rizzo gaining second base eligibility in some fantasy leagues. No one has really employed outfield positional switches regularly. But they make a lot of sense, because they are something very fundamental. Growing up, nearly everyone pulled the ball and nearly everyone hit right handed. The worst fielder on the team often played right field, because nothing was being hit there. When the big power guy on the other team came up you would play everyone deeper, and if you were on your feet your right fielder was practically playing center as you shifted the outfield. When the lefty came up, you would try to quickly get the poor sap in right field out of there. Continue reading…