Graph of the Intermittent Time Period

The Phillies were swept in a short two-game series by the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, or as the series has been more commonly referred to, “Mike Trout‘s Homecoming. Did you know that he is From Around Here? He lived in New Jersey and likes the Phillies and the Eagles. Maybe one day he can sign here, because he is from around here.”

It wasn’t exactly the Phillies’ finest showing. In game one, Cody Asche committed three errors, helping bork an otherwise wonderful start by Cliff Lee, who wound up losing to a guy who won his first Major League game. And in game two, the Phillies were shut out for the third time since May 5. Though there is no shame in being dominated by Garrett Richards because he’s a pretty good pitcher.

The loss drops the Phillies to 1-8 in interleague play so far this season. They won’t get another chance to improve that record until August when they play three games at home against the Houston Astros, two out West against the Angels, three at home against the Mariners, as well as three in Oakland against the Athletics in September. Even if the Phillies go 6-5 in the remaining 11 interleague games, they’ll still finish a disappointing 7-13. Sadly, that wouldn’t even be their worst interleague record in a season. Their current .111 winning percentage would be, however.

Historically, the Phillies have been a pretty awful team in interleague play with a .441 record overall (71 wins over 162 games) and .385 since 2006 (62 wins).

The Phillies’ .441 winning percentage overall in interleague play is the fourth-worst in baseball, ahead of only the Cincinnati Reds, San Diego Padres, and Pittsburgh Pirates:

Tm G W L W-L% RS RA pythW-L%
NYY 295 178 117 .603 1492 1234 .584
ANA 296 176 120 .595 1465 1234 .578
BOS 293 171 122 .584 1557 1230 .606
CHW 298 168 130 .564 1522 1381 .544
OAK 291 163 128 .560 1344 1194 .554
MIN 290 158 132 .545 1360 1308 .518
DET 293 158 135 .539 1378 1285 .532
ATL 264 140 124 .530 1173 1154 .507
SEA 291 154 137 .529 1246 1122 .548
STL 240 127 113 .529 1218 1162 .522
NYM 273 142 131 .520 1262 1262 .500
TEX 295 152 143 .515 1503 1435 .521
FLA 278 140 138 .504 1277 1278 .500
SFG 261 129 132 .494 1102 1144 .483
TOR 295 144 151 .488 1411 1353 .519
TBD 291 141 150 .485 1341 1404 .479
CLE 294 141 153 .480 1354 1291 .522
ARI 258 122 136 .473 1194 1269 .472
MON 293 137 156 .468 1194 1400 .428
LAD 263 122 141 .464 1063 1160 .460
HOU 252 117 135 .464 1149 1267 .455
KCR 293 135 158 .461 1437 1511 .477
CHC 246 113 133 .459 1101 1178 .469
COL 250 114 137 .456 1256 1345 .469
BAL 290 131 159 .452 1303 1414 .463
MIL 240 108 132 .450 1127 1231 .460
PHI 279 123 156 .441 1292 1454 .447
CIN 245 107 138 .437 1093 1223 .449
SDP 267 115 152 .431 1037 1198 .434
PIT 239 101 138 .423 1050 1180 .447
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 5/15/2014.

The Phillies’ biggest interleague foe historically has been the Angels, having lost seven of eight to them. Next are the Seattle Mariners, losing seven of nine, followed by the Rays (7-14). The full list:

Phillies Interleague Opponent G W L W-L% RS RA
Chicago White Sox 12 7 5 .583 68 64
Texas Rangers 12 7 5 .583 60 53
Cleveland Indians 13 7 6 .538 60 77
Oakland Athletics 12 6 6 .500 39 34
Baltimore Orioles 45 22 23 .489 241 241
Minnesota Twins 15 7 8 .467 69 73
Kansas City Royals 9 4 5 .444 45 64
Boston Red Sox 50 22 28 .440 228 286
New York Yankees 21 9 12 .429 108 116
Toronto Blue Jays 40 17 23 .425 187 203
Detroit Tigers 12 5 7 .417 56 70
Tampa Bay Rays 21 7 14 .333 98 110
Seattle Mariners 9 2 7 .222 18 33
Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim 8 1 7 .125 15 30

By division, the Phillies are 77-100 (.435) against the AL East, 30-31 (.492) against the AL Central, and 16-25 (.390) against the AL West.

The Phillies’ struggles against the AL East are easily explained by the Yankees and Red Sox (and more recently, the Rays) being powerhouses. Their struggles against the AL West are less easily explained — perhaps unfamiliarity, or small sample randomness. Whatever the case, the Phillies are happy to be out of the interleague jungle for about three months.

Leave a Reply

*

Next ArticleShould the Phillies Go After Kyle Farnsworth?