Freddy Garcia Redux?

You didn’t hear it here, but… Pat Gillick is good at acquiring damaged goods. Before last season, Gillick traded for Freddy Garcia and sent failed project Gavin Floyd and prized left-hander and strikeout artist Gio Gonzalez to the White Sox. Garcia’s tenure with the Phillies was most unimpressive: 11 starts, 58 innings, 5.90 ERA, and a 1.6 WHIP. His season was shut down on June 8 after a chronic shoulder problem could be hidden no longer.

It’s not Garcia’s fault, though. He had good intentions in hiding his shoulder problems. The real problem lies with the Phillies’ upper management:

General manager Pat Gillick insisted Garcia wasn’t “damaged goods” when the team acquired him. Even though some reports said Garcia’s velocity was down toward the end of last season, the Phillies didn’t make the trade contingent upon him passing a physical.

“We didn’t think a physical was necessary,” Gillick said. “Our doctors spoke to their doctors and our training staff spoke to theirs and we were satisfied his health was good. Our scouts saw him pitch in September. They thought he was healthy.”

Breathe easy — the Phillies did, in fact, require Lidge to pass a physical before completing the trade with the Houston Astros and new GM Ed Wade.

The flame-throwing right-hander threw one pitch on Saturday and ended up re-injuring his right knee. Lidge had surgery on the knee in October and the Phillies required him to have surgery once again, a partial medial menisectomy. It was successful:

“The other side of the knee is fine,” Phillies trainer Scott Sheridan told ESPN.com‘s Jayson Stark on Monday. Sheridan called Lidge’s injury and the subsequent successful surgery “the best-case scenario” for the Phillies.

[…]

“Right now, if we had to do this during the season, then obviously you’re missing a big chunk of the season,” Lidge said. “I definitely need a few bullpen sessions, but I feel like my arm is ahead of schedule so after a week I should be able to throw again.”

Tom Gordon will take over as closer in the meantime, and Brett Myers will not be returning to the bullpen.

The Lidge injury has to make you wonder about Gillick, though. He’s acquired a few who have had some kind of injury risk come to fruition. Adam Eaton and Tom Gordon are a couple that come to mind besides Garcia and Lidge.

Elsewhere…

Kyle Lohse

Kyle Lohse continues to roam around Arizona looking for a Major League job. According to the Phillies article:

Lohse said he would still welcome a return to Philadelphia, but the Phillies didn’t like his salary demands after they were shunned in what was believed to have been an offer in the three-year, $20-million range. Of course, that could change if Brad Lidge’s right knee is serious, and Brett Myers shifts back to the bullpen.

I never thought I’d say this about any league-average starting pitcher, but the Phillies need Kyle Lohse. He would bump the injury-prone and highly unimpressive Adam Eaton from the rotation and give the Phillies league-average production from the #5 spot, an offering most teams would love to have (which makes Lohse’s continued unemployment all the more perplexing).

The Phillies are correct in being offended at Lohse’s high demands, but three years, $20 million is also insulting to Lohse based on the current market.

It would be insulting to me, as a Phillies fan, if I was to find out that Gillick or Amaro have stopped talking to Lohse after he rejected that three-year offer. The Phillies need a reliable starting rotation like a diabetic needs insulin [insert laugh track].

Scott Rolen

Oh boy.

Scott Rolen would have waived his no-trade clause to return to Philadelphia had the chance presented itself this winter.

I will let the numbers speak for themselves.

Scott Rolen avg. WARP with Cardinals (2003-07): 7.86 (excludes ’02 when he was traded from the Phillies and includes his injury-plagued ’05 season).

Pedro Feliz avg. WARP with Giants since getting regular playing time: 4.10.

Of course, their contracts have to be taken into account as well (information per Cot’s Contracts).

Rolen: $11 million in each of ’08, ’09, and ’10 with an extra $4 million bonus due in ’10; full no-trade clause.

Feliz: $3 million in ’08, $5 million in ’09, and a $5 million club option in ’10 with a $500,000 buyout.

If the Phillies had acquired Rolen instead of Feliz, they’d be paying an extra $8 million this season and $6 million in ’09 for about three and a half extra wins. And the Phillies would have had to have sent something of value to the Jays.

The problem with Rolen, of course, is his injury propensity. After getting 400+ AB in every season from 1997-2004, he failed to cross that plateau in 2005 (196 AB) and ’07 (392 AB). Feliz has no nagging injury problems.

As for the poor relationship between the Phillies’ front office and Rolen:

“We felt if he came in and played well, all that other stuff would be water under the bridge,” [Phillies Assistant GM Mike] Arbuckle said. “But if we guessed wrong on the shoulder, we didn’t think we’d be in a position to absorb another injury that would limit our flexibility to fill other needs.”

Rolen definitely would’ve been a better acquisition, but given his salary, it may have hindered the ability for the Phillies to sign anyone else, like Kyle Lohse. Of course, if the Phillies fail to pick up another pitcher, it will all be moot…

Aaron Rowand

Have fun in last place.

There’s a lot of Rowand to quote from that article, so I won’t do it here, but to paraphrase, he’s offended that Pat Gillick considered him an injury risk and that the Phillies didn’t see him as part of their “core.”

“I’ve been on the DL twice in my life, not just in my professional career. That includes college, high school. And it was both in ’06. [Gillick] saw me play for 2 years and I was on the DL twice. But, knock on wood, I’ve been lucky. I’d be lying to you if I said that didn’t bother me.”

Rowand took a five-year, $60 million deal from a last place team. Obviously, money is his #1 priority, especially since he’s already won a World Series and he has a mainstream following. Giving $12 million a year to a player who puts his own safety at risk (link — go to May 11) and his teammates’ as well, is not smart. Add to that he’s a slightly better than average center fielder both offensively and defensively, and it’s just not smart to lock him up long-term, especially at an average of $12 million per season.

One can’t fault Rowand, however, for chasing the bigger contract. Just don’t feel sorry for him when the Giants hit 70 wins two weeks away from the end of September, while the Phillies are in the thick of a race for the NL East crown.

Super Baseballers Brawl

Sorry for the lame pun of the video game, but it’s true, the Phillies and the Mets are looking forward to a possible brawl during the season.

Rollins doesn’t have much to be angry about. He’s the reigning National League MVP and seems to have a lot of fun with this stuff. But according to a report by ESPN’s Jayson Stark, a few of Rollins’ Philly teammates have been privately fuming about Beltran’s comments and even suggested to Stark that “there will be a brawl this year.”

Brawls, of course, are awesome because you get to watch around 75 grown men pretend they know how to fight. Most times, these brawls just result in a little pushing and shoving with no punches thrown. However, a couple one-on-one match-ups would be interesting:

  • Pat Burrell vs. Billy Wagner: Their verbal sparring boiling over into a physical confrontation would almost be too entertaining for cable TV. Burrell, of course, called Wagner a “rat” after he left the Phillies for the Mets. In 2007, Burrell victimized Billy Wagner twice:
    • June 7: Burrell ties the game up at 3 apiece with a solo home run to left-center.
    • August 30: Burrell hits a solo home run to left field to bring the Phillies one run behind the Mets at 10-9. The next inning, Jayson Werth singled and stole both second and third base (Wagner is awful at holding runners). He was promptly driven in by Tadahito Iguchi to tie the game at 10 apiece.
  • Jimmy Rollins vs. Carlos Beltran: Obviously, this is interesting because of Beltran’s comments mimicking Rollins. Rollins called Beltran a plagiarist.
  • Brett Myers vs. Anna Benson: It’s unlikely these two would come to blows, even though Anna is a woman and Brett loves hitting women. Should there be a bench-clearing brawl, it is highly likely Mrs. Benson has sequestered a young lad in the pits of Citizens Bank Park for, I don’t know, a talk?
  • Shane Victorino vs. Jose Reyes: This duel would not be settled via fisticuffs; rather, the two would engage in a footrace to settle the question, “Who is the fastest player in Major League Baseball?”

Which two would you like to see duke it out?