MLB in Cahoots with Criminals

If it wasn’t already blatantly obvious by their sickeningly frequent advertising, State Farm is, of course, a top sponsor of Major League Baseball. As such, State Farm plastered its name and logo all over AT&T Park at this year’s All-Star festivities in San Francisco. On MLB’s website, you couldn’t watch a 15-second highlight this season without having to sit through that tired commercial where a man reminisces about Hank Aaron, his father, and his childhood. Touching, because State Farm cares.

Just kidding. If they really cared, would they be screwing the victims of Hurricane Katrina out of policy payments? As Brian Ross and Joseph Rhee report from ABCNews.com:

State Farm Insurance supervisors systematically demanded that Hurricane Katrina damage reports be buried or replaced or changed so that the company would not have to pay policyholders’ claims in Mississippi, two State Farm insiders tell ABC News.

[…]

[Kerri and Cori Rigsby] say they saw supervisors go to great lengths to pressure outside engineers to prepare reports concluding that damage was caused by water, not covered under State Farm policies, rather than by wind.

They say reports that concluded that damage was caused by wind, for which State Farm would have to pay, were hidden in a special file and new reports were ordered.

Don Barrett of the Scruggs Katrina Group goes over an extensive list of State Farm’s misdeeds.

Remember State Farm’s legendary jingle, “Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there”? Now it’s ironic.

In this highly-corrupt era of capitalism we find ourselves in here in the United States, it would be remarkable to see Major League Baseball, a huge business, do the right thing by severing its ties with State Farm. Don’t hold your breath, though.

Instead, what both companies can do is have all of the proceeds from the All-Star festivities, for the duration of the contract, be given to the victims of Hurricane Katrina in the Gulf Coast. For years, we saw Century 21 give away houses at the Home Run Derby to people who, presumably, did not need a new house. State Farm could do them one better by giving houses to people who really need houses.

That, I think, is a reasonable proposition.